News

Progressive Palaeontology 2022 Lincoln

Each year the Palaeontographical Society contributes funding towards Progressive Palaeontology (ProgPal), a student-led conference that for many prospective palaeontologists provides an essential transition from undergraduate

Read More

The Rutland Ichthyosaur

Last year the Palaeontographical Society contributed funding towards the excavation of the largest ichthyosaur ever discovered in the UK. In this blog palaeontologist and lead

Read More

Our Latest News

This tetrapod is the earliest known land animal: Pederpes finneyae. it has a backbone and ankles that allowed it to walk on land.
Itโ€™s named after its discoverer, Peder Aspen, and its preparator, Sarah Finney, which is pretty cool. #FossilFriday

Fossil elephants from Essex! ๐Ÿ˜ This is from part 1 of a series of monographs on British fossil #elephants by Scottish palaeontologist Andrew Leith Adams, published in 1877. The beautiful figure depicts the grinding surface of the upper teeth #FossilFriday https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02693445.1877.12027945

Our latest Meet the Council blog is out! Meet Lucy McCob ๐Ÿ‘‹ PalSoc Editor, and Senior Palaeontology Curator at @Museum_Cardiff. https://www.palaeosoc.org/latest-news/meet-the-council-lucy-mccobb/

Please share: online UK PhD Pre-Application Workshop for Physical Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences & related subjects, 7th December, 11-4. Aimed at prospective applicants from minoritised groups or underrepresented backgrounds in GEES. Details: https://rb.gy/lgp1lo.

Carboniferous age sea urchins from Hook Head in Wexford 'one of the most striking fossil finds in the last century' now in the National Museum of Ireland - Natural History. https://www.irishexaminer.com/news/arid-41016929.html @NMIreland

Load More...